VE Day - Bucks Schools Library Service

A blog by Gillian Polding, Area Manager, Children & Young Persons, Buckinghamshire Libraries.

Hi everyone,

With events that were planned for the 75th anniversary of VE (Victory in Europe) Day in May unable to go ahead, the importance of this day has been marked in other ways.

World War II was a pivotal time in British history. Bucks libraries have a collated a special collection of eBooks on stories set in World War 2 to commemorate VE Day. These page-turning reads will give your children a real insight into what life was like for both children and adults, on the battle field and on the Home Front.

 https://buckinghamshire.overdrive.com/library/teens/collection/1074434

Our School Library Service also has a number of other resources for schools to borrow, including a replica evacuee’s suitcase.

Three authors come to mind who have written enthralling accounts of wartime, based on actual events - Michael Foreman, Michael Morpurgo and Michael Rosen.

The missing: The True Story of My Family in World War11 by Michael Rosen is a personal, powerful and resonant account of the Holocaust by turns charming, shocking and heart-breaking, this is the true story of Michael Rosen’s search for his relatives who “went missing” during the Second World War – told through prose, poetry, maps and pictures.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eI4KatU49L0

Interestingly, each of these authors have expressed in interviews similar ideas about the importance of telling children stories about the war

 “Books are the most vital tool of education — they are more important than any other fancy resource. Stories give us knowledge and understanding. They teach us about our place in the world and we learn what happened in the past and how we can do better in the future.” Michael Morpurgo

In a recent interview about his book “After the War Was Over”, Michael Foreman explains

“I lived in a little village on the East Coast of England. Through that village came thousands and thousands of soldiers on their way to the war who would spend some time in our village training. At night they would come and play cards in our front room, my Mother would still be working in the shop and so they would take turns to sit by my bedside and tell me stories. Now we had no books at home, so they couldn't open a book but they could open a whole world of stories because they came from many different backgrounds, different cultures. I think that's the important thing of an adult reading with a child, is that it shouldn't be the adult reading the story and the child sort of just sucks it up, it should be a joint thing. That's where the real warmth comes in to it, what's special about sharing a story with a child and encouraging them to ask all kinds of questions.”

After the War Was Over by Michel Foreman. Pavilion Books, 1995

 

Buckinghamshire School Library Service 

Gillian Polding MCLIP

Area Manager Children and Young Persons

Buckinghamshire Council

01296 382273

Mobile no.07720207010

gillian.polding@buckinghamshire.gov.uk

Walton Street Offices, Walton Street, Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, HP20 1UA

 

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Bucks School Library Service

A blog by Gillian Polding, Area Manager, Children & Young Persons, Buckinghamshire Libraries.

Hi everyone,

I would like to introduce myself as I manage the young people’s library service for Buckinghamshire. This includes Bucks School Library Service.  I hope to be a regular contributor to your forum and am here to help in any way that I can.  In future blogs, I hope to be able to introduce new children’s book titles that you might find useful. One that comes to mind now is:

A free information book explaining the Coronavirus to children, illustrated by Gruffalo illustrator Axel Scheffler. The book answers key questions in simple language appropriate for 5 to 9 year olds.

This is freely accessible to anyone, so please spread the word.

View Book

Published by Nosy Crow, and written by staff within the company, the book has had expert input: Professor Graham Medley of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine acted as a consultant, and the company also had advice from two head teachers and a child psychologist.

The book answers key questions in simple language appropriate for 5 to 9 year olds:

  • What is the coronavirus?
  • How do you catch the coronavirus?
  • What happens if you catch the coronavirus?
  • Why are people worried about catching the coronavirus?
  • Is there a cure for the coronavirus?
  • Why are some places we normally go to closed?
  • What can I do to help?
  • What’s going to happen next?

 

Buckinghamshire School Library Service

Bucks School Library Service offers professional, friendly advice and practical support on all aspects of library resource provision. We offer the opportunity to hire books from us on an annual basis for your own library, saving you money and reducing the worry of books becoming worn, damaged or out of date. We also offer the termly hire of project collections. A project collection is a box of 20 books which support the teaching of the curriculum in the classroom. Each box is individually made up to the needs of the teachers and age range/ ability level of pupils. If you can’t find a package that meets your individual schools’ needs, we are happy to discuss your requirements with you and come up with a suitable alternative. The majority of our services are also available on a Pay as Used (PAU) basis which gives all schools the opportunity to make use of our resources.

Gillian Polding MCLIP

Area Manager Children and Young Persons

Buckinghamshire Council

01296 382273

Mobile 07720207010

gillian.polding@buckinghamshire.gov.uk

Walton Street Offices, Walton Street, Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, HP20 1UA

 

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Back to School

‘Twas the Night before Term – an ode to parents by Helen Shakespeare.

It’s the night before a new term starts and I’m remembering how I used to feel when my two were still in Primary school. As a procrastinator, the final Sunday was fraught with washing and ironing uniform, making packed lunches and discovering the PE kit was missing items that were too late to order. But the relief of dropping them off and knowing it was a temporary end to the frantic and seemingly endless activities that the holiday time contained. Despite being a teacher, I loved that feeling of, ‘over to you...’. In turn, I could have back, that feeling of being pleased to see them after school.

Now parents nationwide are not only having no break from their parenting but during school hours are having to switch from wearing a parent’s hat to a teacher’s for part of everyday. Aside from any teaching skills, it’s terribly confusing for both parties to have to adjust to the same person providing the teaching, the love, the discipline, the comfort, the food and so on. Many parents are also trying to juggle their own work as well as learn a new way of living in isolation with all the angst that brings. The excitement and relief of a new term starting has - this time - during lockdown, given parents a whole new Sunday night feeling.

With this in mind, I want to encourage you all in the great job you are doing:

 

‘Twas the Night before Term – an ode to parents by Helen Shakespeare

 

‘Twas the night before term, when all through the house

Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse.

The front doors were closed and the streets were all clear

The bins were all full of wine bottles and beer.

 

The children were playing on Playstations four

The parents on Netflix or Zoom rooms galore.

They all settled in with their daily routine

Protecting the nation from Covid 19.

 

When on their devices arose such a clatter,

They sprang from their chairs to see what was the matter.

Tonight was a Sunday, seen as a jewel

Until lockdown brought dread at the mention of school.

 

Farewell to the freedom and playground goodbyes,

Hello to the hell of the classroom online.

Tasks and assignments for feedback and ticks

And a rousing beginning with athlete Joe Wicks.

 

Some parents proudly announcing new skills

Others reportedly losing the will.

Would they emerge more fat or more fit?

Or had they decided they don’t give a sh*t?

 

Dreading the watchful eyes of the staff

As they take on the role, on their teacher’s behalf.

“How come we never learnt that way at school?

Grid methods, chunking and algebra rules?”

 

How come my child had such glowing reports

When all I get now is disdainful retorts?

Never again will I whinge at the school

When my little angel has broken a rule.

 

Sleepless and anxious to complete all the tasks

While remotely at work or sewing some masks.

Dressing the top half for meetings on line

While forcing the kids to learn as they whine.

 

And then, in a twinkling, I heard on the street

The clapping and cheering and pans with a beat,

As I opened the door to tumultuous exhort

Of NHS staff and key workers support.

 

Among these tough times of self-isolation

We’ve joined as a team, throughout the whole nation.

Sharing and giving not seen since the war

Epitomised in actions from Captain Tom Moore.

 

So, while we dig deep for our strength and true grit,

Dreading the weeks and trying not to quit,

Look for the blessings, be patient, take heart,

You are being amazing and doing your part.

 

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